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Will Neuromarketing Change the Game? 

What are the ethics of overtly manipulating the subconscious of consumers?

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BY Rhett Power - 09 Dec 2016

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

As a marketing guy for the last 20 years I've tried just about every approach in the book. I've tried cause marketing, relationship marketing, scarcity marketing, call to action marketing, viral marketing, event marketing, outbound and inbound marketing and everything in between. These approaches all have one thing in common, dependence on consumers conscious reaction to the marketing campaigns. Unfortunately, these data-sets can't provide the most important piece of the puzzle-the subconscious response. Neuromarketing has changed that.

Using existing medical technologies to see which parts of the brain respond to certain stimuli, we can fine-tune our efforts to gain a potentially unassailable market edge.

Consider this: science has pinpointed how our sense of smell works, and which odors are most pleasing to people. Scent marketing is such an effective subconscious tool that realtors often use the smell of fresh-baked cookies (chocolate chip is the hands-own favorite) during open-house events. Theaters make sure you smell fresh popcorn, even if the stuff in your carton isn't.

Now take the effectiveness of smell marketing and apply it to color, sound, movement, touch, temperature. The ability to map the actual brain reaction to a set of sensory stimuli provides us with the missing link to effectively market products and services to the very core of a persons decision-making activity.

Neuromarketing takes the guess-work out of developing successful marketing campaigns. If we can stimulate the right parts of the brain, people will be subconsciously pre-disposed to buy what we're selling.

The implications are staggering. Imagine brands patenting a pattern of stimuli, similar to trademarking a look and feel. How will that affect fair market practices? Can a small business compete? And what are the ethics of overtly manipulating the subconscious of consumers?

Regardless of the resolution to these issues, the inevitability of neuromarketing makes it the next, biggest thing. Perhaps it's the last of the revolving door of marketing strategies but I think it might be the way of the future.

Want to read more about how your business might use neuromarketing then take a look at these sites.

1. www.neurosciencemarketing.com

2. www.neuromarketing-labs.com

3. www.nmsba.com

4. www. neuromarketingresearch.com