THE INC. LIFE

Tesla, Facebook, and Google Pen Letters to Trump Urging Him to Keep U.S. in Paris Climate Agreement

Tech leaders including Elon Musk, Jamie Dimon, and Bob Iger–who are all at the helm of powerful companies–also sit on Trump’s business advisory council.

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BY Emily Canal - 11 May 2017

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Top tech leaders from around the world published an open letter to President Donald Trump on Wednesday, urging him not to pull the U.S. out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

Thirty executives from influential companies like Tesla, General Electric and Virgin Group expressed "strong support" for keeping America in the climate change accord. "We are committed to working with you to create jobs and boost U.S. competitiveness, and we believe this can be best achieved by remaining in the Paris Agreement," the executives wrote, adding that leaving the accord would create "negative trade implications."

Some of the most prominent names on the letter are Elon Musk, Jamie Dimon and Bob Iger, CEOs of Tesla, JPMorgan Chase and Walt Disney, respectively. These leaders are at the helm of powerful companies but also sit on Trump's business advisory council.

The Paris Agreement went into effect November 2016 and is considered the world's most comprehensive plan for fighting climate change. It commits virtually all countries to limiting global warming and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, during his campaign, Trump vowed to "cancel" the agreement and expressed skepticism towards climate science. Trump advisors had planned to meet on Tuesday to reach a final decision on the agreement, however a verdict may be announced at the G7 Summit at the end of the month.

This isn't the only letter regarding the Paris Agreement that was addressed to Trump this week: 24 companies including Apple, Facebook, and Google wrote that the Paris accord would help the American economy by creating jobs in clean energy technology and reducing business risks related to declining agricultural productivity and water supplies.

"As businesses concerned with the well-being of our customers, our investors, our communities and our suppliers, we are strengthening our climate resilience, and we are investing in innovative technologies that can help achieve a clean energy transition," the companies wrote in the letter that was published in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and New York Post. "For this transition to succeed, however, governments must lead as well."