THE INC. LIFE

Stop Apologizing for Your Success

Seven powerful tips to help women celebrate their accomplishments

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BY Melissa Lamson - 13 Jun 2018

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Women, we need to stop apologizing for our successes. We need to start channeling characters like Miranda Hobbes, from Sex in the City; and model confidence and focus for all of the young girls watching us. "It's time to be 'a Miranda,'" said Cynthia Nixon. "One thing I always loved about that spirited redhead was that she didn't suppress her ambitions in order to be more 'likable,' nor did she try to squeeze herself into stereotypical notions of womanhood and femininity," she stated.

And Miranda Hobbes did not apologize for her success.

"As a successful lawyer on [Sex in the City], Nixon's character often found that she was more successful and more well-off than the men in her life, but she would hardly apologize for it. Why should she?" asks Rose Burke.

Why indeed?

I just heard a disturbing story about a woman who had worked really hard and had accomplished something for her firm that hadn't ever been done before. Her accomplishment created tremendous positive change for her company. The executives in her firm publicly praised her, but then someone started saying behind her back that she was being celebrated just because she was a woman. Of course, the comments got back to her and made her feel like she should have downplayed her accomplishment.

Has anyone ever said that to you? Maybe you've had the same experience of hearing that people in your company are talking behind your back, assuming that you only got the job, the promotion, the raise, the opportunity because you're a woman.

It's not uncommon.

Many women experience this. "They often feel the unspoken implication is '... and don't you forget it.' In other words, they got a job they didn't deserve. They had a door opened for them because they were wearing a skirt," writes Patti Fletcher in a post for Entrepreneur.com

"The truth of it is that men are hired for what they might be able to do. Women are hired only if they've proven themselves over and over again," writes Fletcher.

Women, as young girls, are taught to collaborate, share, be nice, but not to stick our necks out and tout our achievements. We are expected to be nice. If we promote our successes, our colleagues perceive this as being opportunistic or arrogant. Even our female co-workers. In this, we women can be our own worst enemies here.

There's a double standard at play here.

"What is really going on, as peer-reviewed studies continually find, is that high-achieving women experience social backlash because their very success - and specifically the behaviors that created that success - violates our expectations about how women are supposed to behave," writes Marianne Cooper, for the Harvard Business Review. "Women are expected to be nice, warm, friendly, and nurturing. Thus, if a woman acts assertively or competitively, if she pushes her team to perform, if she exhibits decisive and forceful leadership, she is deviating from the social script that dictates how she 'should' behave."

Success and likability are correlated in men but are not in women.

This was made clear in a case study for the Columbia Business School which profiled Heidi Roizen, a successful Silicon Valley venture capitalist. In presenting the case study to his class, however, Professor Frank Flynn gave half the class the case study showcasing Heidi's successes. The other half of the class was given a case study with a different name and learned about the successes achieved by "Howard" Roizen. The research demonstrated the negative correlation for women between power and success.

What can we do?

As women, we need to share our success with others so we can act as role models for others--particularly those women who might be more unsure about how to self-promote and advocate for their own success. Not only does it not help us to hide behind our work and accomplishments, hoping they'll speak for themselves, it actually hurts us. And it hurts others.

#TimesUp. It's time for a change.

Research shows that men in particular view a lack of self-touting achievements as a lack of self-confidence. As women, we need to be visible, share what we're working on, celebrate successes, help others and ask others to advocate for us.

Today, especially, we have a moral obligation to take on leadership roles and help change the dynamic at the top for women and men. We can create more gender parity in organizations if we talk about our achievements, share success, and celebrate our accomplishments.

Are you wondering how you can help?

  1. Don't bury yourself in your laptop or tablet at work.
  2. Use meetings as an opportunity to network and talk about your accomplishments.
  3. Share your successes by email, and in person.
  4. Talk about your manager and your team's accomplishments, as well as your own.
  5. Be visible in all-hands, in coffee corners or online, sharing compelling content.
  6. Speak about results, not just what you're doing.
  7. Combat negative comments or tear-down behaviors by encouraging a correlation between success and likability--for all.