THE INC. LIFE

How Facebook Plans to Use Your Nude Photos to Combat Revenge Porn

The social media platform is asking users to send their most personal pictures to help it combat revenge porn.

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BY Emily Canal - 09 Nov 2017

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Would you trust Facebook with your nude photos? The social media platform is asking users to send their most personal pictures to help it combat revenge porn.

Facebook says if you send in your explicit shots, it will make sure they never appear on the social network. The company will use the photo to make a digital footprint so its image-matching technology can stop someone from uploading a copy. The program will be tested in Australia first, followed by the U.S., U.K., and Canada, the Times of London reported.

While the program sounds like a useful safeguard for some users, there are security concerns. Completely deleting a digital photo is a difficult process, digital forensics expert Lesley Carhart told Motherboard. "Yes, they're not storing a copy, but the image is still being transmitted and processed. Leaving forensic evidence in memory and potentially on disk," she said. Facebook says it won't store the photos.

Four percent of internet users in the U.S. have been victims of revenge porn and 10 percent of women under the age of 30 have had someone threaten to expose explicit photos of them online, according to a 2016 study by the research institute Data & Society.

Facebook has already gives users the option to report revenge porn, and will remove pictures and block the person who uploaded them from future sharing. Still, Facebook remains an attractive venue for those who would expose explicit pictures.

"With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim," Carrie Goldberg, a lawyer who specializes in sexual privacy told The Guardian.