TECHNOLOGY

5 Things You Should Watch Out for in Apple’s Big Annual Developer Conference

From iOS updates to an “iPad X.”

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BY Antonio Villas-Boas - 05 Jun 2018

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Apple's biggest conference of the year, WWDC, is taking place today, Monday, at 10 a.m. PT/1 p.m. EST.

At WWDC, we usually hear what Apple has planned for its big yearly software updates for iPhones, iPads, and Mac computers.

We also sometimes get news about new hardware products, some of which are in dire need of an update, like the MacBook Air. But the rumor mill hasn't been optimistic that Apple will announce any new hardware at this year's WWDC.

Check out the five major things we expect Apple to mention at this year's WWDC:

Details and features about iOS 12, the next operating system for iPhones and iPads.

Details and features about iOS 12, the next operating system for iPhones and iPads.Apple

iOS 12 is rumored to come with new Animoji for the iPhone X, and you'll be able to use Animoji for FaceTime calls, according to MacRumors.

Other updates include Siri integration in the Photos app and more control over the Do Not Disturb feature for blocking notifications. For the most part, we're expecting this year to be about refining current features as opposed to adding new ones, but it wouldn't be an Apple event without a few surprises.

A new version of macOS.

A new version of macOS.Hollis Johnson/Business Insider

Few rumors exist about macOS 14, the successor to macOS 13 (a.k.a. "High Sierra") that's currently the latest version for Mac computers.

The biggest rumor of note is compatibility with iPhone and iPad apps, which means we could be running iOS apps on Mac computers. At first glance, that's a move that could make it easier to use iOS apps while you're sitting and working on your Mac computer. You wouldn't need to break your workflow to switch between your iOS device and your Mac computer to use an iOS app.

New details about an upgrade to the Mac Pro.

New details about an upgrade to the Mac Pro.Getty Images/Justin Sullivan

Back in April 2017, Apple executives mentioned to tech sites, including TechCrunch, that it was working on a new updated version of its modular Mac Pro desktop computer, which was originally released in 2013. It's almost a year later and we're expecting some kind of details surrounding the new Mac Pro, given Apple's recent efforts to address professional users.

Rumors are going around about a new MacBook Air.

Rumors are going around about a new MacBook Air.Apple

Like the Mac Pro, the MacBook Air could really do with an upgrade. It's still one of Apple's best laptops, as it offers a great blend of portability and performance. But that performance is slowly waning. The latest refresh to the MacBook Air in 2015 included a fifth-generation Intel processor, and Intel is now on its eighth generation of processors.

The current MacBook Air is also severely lacking in the display category. It's a fuzzy 900p display with washed-out colors and poor contrast compared to the glorious Retina displays on MacBook Pros.

With all that in mind, it's welcoming to see a prediction from Ming-Chi Kuo - one of the most prolific Apple analysts in the business -- that Apple may be updating the MacBook Air with a display that's similar to the 13-inch MacBook Pro. It could also come at a more affordable price under $1,000, too.

There are rumors about a new iPad Pro that looks like the iPhone X.

There are rumors about a new iPad Pro that looks like the iPhone X.

A concept of a new iPad Pro with an iPhone X-style design by 3D render artist Martin Hajek. Martin Hajek

This year, Apple is rumored to update its iPad Pro lineup with an iPhone X-style design with narrower bezels, and even the iPhone X's TrueDepth camera that's used for FaceID and Animoji, according to a report from analyst Jun Zhang of Rosenblatt Securities obtained by Macworld. Zhang notes that Apple announced the second-generation iPad Pro at last year's WWDC, making an announcement for a redesigned tablet at this year's event entirely plausible.

This post originally appeared on Business Insider.