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7 Secrets to Creating a Killer Podcast in Southeast Asia

Former Park Ranger turned Podcast Coach Jody Mayberry shares 7 secrets to crafting an irresistible audio podcast.

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BY John Nemo - 06 Dec 2017

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Podcast Coach Jody Maberry is almost as colorful a character as the various podcasts he hosts, produces and creates for his wide array of clients.

A former financial analyst turned Pacific Northwest park ranger turned podcast consultant, Maberry channeled a passion (parks and recreation) into a hit podcast, Park Leaders, that garnered national attention and spawned a new business of creating, hosting and producing podcasts for clients around the United States.

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"I spent several years as a park ranger, studying the reasons why parks are some of America's favorite places," he says. "As a park ranger, I was deliberate about helping people create a story worth telling."

He now does that for podcast clients as varied as real estate agents to sharing leadership lessons from the former executive in charge of Walt Disney World.

7 Secrets To Creating a Killer Podcast

Maberry, who has spent countless thousands of hours behind the microphone producing, hosting and promoting hundreds of different podcast episodes and shows across a variety of industries, recently shared 7 specific steps behind creating a successful podcast.

Secret #1: Show up consistently.

"When people start listening to you show regularly you become part of their routine," he says. "If you publish a weekly show, they expect you to be there every week. If you don't show up enough times, they will move on to someone else who will be there for them."

Secret #2: Give to 1 like you would for 1,000.

"Don't get discouraged if you only have one hundred downloads each episode," Maberry says. "If one hundred people showed up to watch a presentation, you would be happy about it, right?

"What is different about one hundred people showing up to listen to your podcast? Always deliver excellent content to your audience, whether it is one person, one hundred or one thousand."

Secret #3: Narrow Down Episode Content.

"An episode about specific, narrow content can help people more than big broad sweeping topics," he says. "An episode of The Jody Maberry Show about how to be creative with the outgoing voicemail message on your phone received a tremendous response because it focused on a single topic with actionable content."

Secret #4: Talk To One Person at a Time.

Often, according to Maberry, podcast hosts say "to all of you listening" or something similar to reference the entire listening audience.

"To someone listening, the entire listening audience is one person," he says. "How you address them will help create that intimate, one-on-one feeling. When you say 'all of you,' you break the image that you are there with the single listener."

Secret #5: With an Interview, Talk Like There are 3 People - You, the Interviewee and the Listener

"People don't want to be a fly on the wall during a great conversation, they want to be a part of the conversation," Maberry says. "I swat a fly on the wall, but I invite a friend to sit at the table and join the conversation."

Secret #6: Use Content Upgrades.

If people are interested in what you are talking about, they may want to go deeper, Maberry says. Give them the opportunity to do so with content upgrades.

"A content upgrade is a PDF, webinar or a video relevant to the topic," he says. "Plus, this is a great way to build your email list."

Secret #7: Map Out Your Content in Advance.

"One of the reasons so many podcasts fade away is because it is difficult to create content every week," Maberry says. "You can get ahead of the curve by mapping out the content of your episode in advance. Do this and you will never find your self wondering what to talk about for next week's episode."

From park ranger stories to creating Disney magic, Jody Maberry understands the power of podcasts to connect with an audience, build an intimate relationship and then leverage that engagement for business opportunities.

"It's been a blessing doing this," he says. "And it's a great way to build your business, too."