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This Start-up Wants to Inspire Southeast Asian Millennials to be Entrepreneurs

Media platform ???Millennials believes content must be 80% fun and 20% educational

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BY Ezra Ferraz - 28 Sep 2017

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Start-ups may seem all the rage among millennials today, but the latter is still a minority in the ecosystem.

Kah Jun and Kai Yong, the co-founders of ???Millennials, want to change this. While they believe that the average young person is familiar with start-ups, they may have a warped definition of what it is exactly.

“To some of them, it means working in a colorful office with bean bags, wearing slippers and T-shirts freely — and the freedom to work anywhere at any time. To some of them, it’s a means to make quick money by raising huge amount of capital,” Yong says.

The lack of deeper understanding of what a start-up really is worries both founders because millennials will be the driving force in the economy, and entrepreneurship will ideally be a key part of that. This is why they created media platform ???Millennials.

???Millennials is founded because we want to empower young people with start-up knowledge, giving them a new perspective of hacking their growth in mindset, skills, and experience. After all, what’s life without growth?” Yong asks.

Like the start-ups they cover, ???Millennials has already pivoted since its inception. They initially started their platform with tutorial-style videos, but they fared quite poorly after the first few weeks. They had to change their strategy to focus on 80% fun content, 20% educational.

“As much as we hate the omnipresence of ‘junk content’ on social media, we learn from them, analyze how they go viral and apply the same concept to the messages that we want to send to our audience because our audience, which are young people, love watching these funny, meaningless videos that resonate with their everyday life. So why not educate them in a way that they like?” Yong says.

As an example, they produced a video entitled “Start-up people versus normal people.” Though some may be quick to dismiss the video as carrying little educational value, Jun calls on people to remember that this was shot for millennials in mind.

“Our 80:20 (Fun:Education) rule here works because it resonates with, one, founders and some of the people working in a start-up, and, two, people who have friends working in a start-up,” he says, adding that viewers will inevitably share the content, creating the awareness necessary to move toward education.

In terms of messaging, the co-founders want their young audience to understand that start-ups and entrepreneurship are key to a nation’s prosperity.

“Take a look at the countries with the highest GDP i.e. U.S. and China, the sheer amount of start-ups in these countries inject a new form of work ethic, disrupt many industries and create huge-scale economic growth because start-up culture drives people to step out of their comfort zone and innovate,” Jun says.

Though this is a message that is easy for people to rally behind, growing a content platform is an uphill battle. “With the style we present and the way we showcase our content, we are definitely the niche of the niche, as combining both fun and start-up together in Asia is a tough job,” he says.

So unlike other content platforms, ???Millennials does not measure its success in terms of reach or readership.

“Even if it’s only a very small percentage of young people who can appreciate our purpose, the action they take after learning from us can make a lot of difference in this world. Other than producing content to educate them, we aim to create an active community of young people to exchange start-up skills and resources through learning from one another and we believe that’s how a start-up ecosystem is built. Quality over quantity is our core principle,” Jun says.