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The Next Generation: How Companies Can Attract Gen Z Employees

Hard-working, loyal, and driven, Gen Z has the potential to be your company’s biggest assets

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BY Cristina Morales - 06 Jun 2017

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Much has been said and written about millennials: what makes them tick, how to communicate with them, and how to retain millennial talent. But it’s about time that we start shifting our focus towards what’s to come: Generation Z. After all, in three years, Gen Z will account for more than 20% of the workforce.

Born from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s, this post-millennial generation is global, highly driven, responsible, and great at multi-tasking. “They have high expectations not only of themselves, but also of their employers,” says Cindy Leong, founder of Singapore-based personality training center Relationship Studio. How can your company attract the most talented of this next generation? Here’s what Leong had to say.

1. Be efficient

“Generation Z thrives on new technologies,” says Leong. Born into the digital age, they don’t remember having to make do with the snail-paced speeds of dial-up Internet and having to rewind VHS tapes before returning them to your local video rental store.

It follows that Gen Z would have little patience for inefficiencies. Using obsolete software? Or are you wasting time on manual, convoluted processes? Updating and streamlining will not only attract and retain Gen Z talent, but will also make your team more productive as a whole.

2. Give them a sense of purpose

Gen Z has a strong sense of social justice and a desire to make a difference in the world and leave their mark. But just because your company isn’t a non-profit doesn’t mean that you can’t appeal to them.

Though it makes sense to refrain from giving your junior employees more than they can chew, bosses shouldn’t assume that the office’s fresh faces are only capable of menial tasks. Leong advises bosses to give their Gen Z employees “important tasks that will allow them to express their individuality and contribute.”

3. Make them feel secure

Many Gen Z-ers have seen their parents struggle with finances, and so they know the value of money and are more prudent with their resources than millennials. They’re willing to put in the work to bring home the bacon, and are willing to stay with a company for long periods of time to further their career. But, as Leong points out, “if they don’t feel appreciated, they’ll just move on.”

Bosses can help their Gen Z employees feel like they have a future in their company by having genuine conversations with them, acknowledging their good work, and of course, offering good salaries and benefits. Invest in your young employees, give them room to grow and thrive, and you’ll have some of the most loyal young talent in the marketplace.