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Meet the Accidental Food Delivery Start-up from Malaysia

RunningMan.my recently hit $1 million in revenue

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BY Ezra Ferraz - 04 Oct 2017

PHOTO CREDIT: Getty Images

Though most founders tend to focus on a eureka moment behind the founding of their start-up, Andrew Chee, the CEO and co-founder of Malaysian food delivery start-up RunningMan.my, is not afraid to admit he began with no particularly grand intentions.

“It all started from a really small idea with no initial intention to scale up and grow into the stage we are today. Initially, we started this business just as a side project when my partner and I were studying to make some pocket money,” he says.

RunningMan.my recently hit $1 million in revenue, and the co-founders are planning to maximize market share in Klang Valley before expanding into other parts of Malaysia. Chee believes they were able to achieve these milestones so quickly because of the high demand for the service, even with many competitors in the same space.

“We were able to find out our unique selling point, hence successfully securing users quickly in a short time that enabled the company to grow fast. Our business model itself was quite viable as we were able to generate revenue since day one,” Chee says.

He also feels RunningMan.my has several key differences from other food delivery providers.

“No minimum order is one. We can even deliver a teh tarik which is below RM5. Secondly, we focus on a wide variety of choices to suit Malaysian taste. We even deliver hawker food,” he says.

With RunningMan.my growing fast, the biggest challenge to date has been expanding their delivery manpower to keep up with demand.

“After all, we are not a start-up that [relies solely on technology in order to scale]. We are more like a platform where deliverymen or runners are our key assets to grow. This part of the business needs to grow at the same pace as user growth,” he says.

Despite the need to onboard runners at a frantic pace, RunningMan.my can get food to customers in a relatively quick time. After navigating to RunningMan.my, selecting their area and putting in their delivery — with the option to order from multiple eateries at once — they can expect for their food to arrive within 1 hour.

Of course, when dealing with hundreds of deliveries per day, RunningMan.my will inevitably experience a few hiccups. As a start-up without venture capital-backing at least for now, Chee admits the platform still has plenty of room for improvement, so they try to improve from all the feedback they get — both good and bad — to attract more users.

Chee says problems most often result from the weather.

“The best practice for us is to be very sensitive and responsive [to] the delivery time of each task. Even with just a few drops of rain, we have to take action on notifying the customer about the delay and make communications to the deliveryman to make sure everything is okay. In short, the customer is king — without users, the platform will have zero value,” he says.